Wednesday, 29 February 2012

Hunger strikers' health deteriorate, Remain committed to carry-on fast

Phayul[Wednesday, February 29, 2012 09:26]
Members of China Democracy Party at the indefinite fast venue in front of the UN Headquarters to show their solidarity with the hunger strikers on February 28, 2012.
Members of China Democracy Party at the indefinite fast venue in front of the UN Headquarters to show their solidarity with the hunger strikers on February 28, 2012.
DHARAMSHALA, February 29: Signs of physical deterioration have now started showing on the three hunger strikers who are now into the second week of their indefinite fast outside the United Nations headquarters in New York.

Tsewang Rigzin, president of the Tibetan Youth Congress, the largest pro-independence group in exile and organisers of the indefinite fast told Phayul that the body movements of the three Tibetans have “relatively slowed down” and their voices have become strained with the freezing New York wind and rain.

“The physical deteriorations are now visibly noticeable - Shingza Rinpoche has lost 3 kgs; Dorjee Gyalpo and Yeshi Tenzing have lost 2 kgs each,” Rigzin said.

However, Rigzin added that the hunger strikers remain “resolute and steadfast” in their appeal to the UN and world leaders to intervene and engage directly with the Chinese leadership to “stop the ongoing genocide” in Tibet.

The three Tibetans began their indefinite fast on February 22, coinciding with the first day of Losar – Tibetan new year.

The three are directly appealing the UN to immediately send a fact-finding delegation to Tibet, put pressure on China – to stop the undeclared martial law in Tibet, to allow international media, to release all political prisoners including Gedun Choekyi Nyima and Tulku Tenzin Delek, and to stop “patriotic re-education” campaigns in Tibet.

Since 2009, 23 Tibetans have torched their bodies inside Tibet demanding the return of exiled spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama and freedom in Tibet. The dramatic escalation in self-immolations in recent weeks has come amidst growing repression and military clampdown in many Tibetan areas.

Rigzin added that hundreds of Tibetans and supporters continue to visit the site of the protest to offer respect and gratitude to the hunger strikers.

Dr Yang Jianli, a Chinese pro-democracy activist and survivour of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre tweeted that he will be joining the three Tibetans in their fast on Saturday.


“These unswervingly thoughtful and sincere gestures by Tibetans, supporters, and complete strangers not only help inspire and raise the spirits of the hunger-strikers but it sends hope to our sisters and brothers sacrificing their lives in Tibet,” the TYC president said.

An appeal letter on behalf of the hunger strikers has also been delivered to the UN General Secretary Ban Ki-Moon.

Tuesday, 28 February 2012

What if self Immolations happened in the UK

I was taking to some friend about Tibet last night when the subject of self immolations happening in the UK came up.  The fact that over 20 Tibetan monks/nuns have taken this action in Tibet over the last year has hardly penetrated the western media.  Why is that?  Is it because the western media requires immediate images to create the news and mobile phone footage  a week later is not good enough?
What if a Tibetan Monk self immolated in the middle of Oxford street London on a Saturday afternoon?  There would be over 100 video images in HD being circulated on the net within minutes even before the emergency services have arrived.  All news organisations would have it as a headline and top politicians would be required to provide a comment.
Fortunately the oppressive conditions that have produced these immolations in Tibetan areas of China do not exist in the UK. We have democratic processes, separation of powers and the rule of law in the UK.  Tibet has non of these and the only options for religious practitioners  are to do what the Communist Party says, denounce the Dalai Lama as a 'splittist' and undertake patriotic re-education.


     

Monday, 27 February 2012

International media presence in Lhasa worse than Pyongyang

Phayul[Monday, February 27, 2012 06:44]
DHARAMSHALA, February 27: Reporters Without Borders, the global press freedom organisation has expressed “alarm” at the total media blackout imposed by Chinese authorities in Tibet, preventing all media coverage of the ongoing wave of self-immolations and mass demonstrations in the region.

“Not only are foreign media organisations prevented from covering these events, but the authorities have also organised a veritable disinformation campaign, using pro-government media such as the Global Times, which play down the disturbances and accuse the international community of interfering,” RSF said in a special report last week.

“Out of sight of the world, a major crisis is unfolding. Even Pyongyang has an international media presence, which is not the case in Lhasa.”

Accusing China of once again aiming to “control the Tibetan people behind closed doors” by excluding journalists, the group said Beijing is trying to restrict all communication between the region and the rest of the world.

“Connections are cut off, access is blocked and content linked to the unrest is removed,” the report said. “Local community networks are particularly targeted in order to nip in the bud any attempt at mobilising support online.”

RSF noted that since January 24, Internet and cell phone networks have been severely disrupted within a radius of 50 km around Serthar, eastern Tibet following massive demonstrations in the region.

Websites of Tibetan exile media organisations are inaccessible, while discussion forums and blogs in the Tibetan language, such as Sangdhor.com and Rangdrol.net, have also been blocked since February 3, the group said.

Taking note of the unlawful restrictions on foreign journalists, including BBC and CNN from entering eastern Tibet, the group said journalists suspected of wishing to defy police instructions are victims of harassment by the security forces.

“Some have complained of being followed, others that they have been escorted to the airport by the police, questioned for several hours, forced to wipe the pictures they have taken and have had their equipment seized,” RSF said.

“These infringements create an atmosphere of constant surveillance which add to the stress levels and affect the psychological well-being of some media workers.”

The report also condemned China for embarking on a “campaign of disinformation” which includes hacking of overseas media networks for propaganda purposes.

According to the world press freedom index compiled by RSF, China fell six places in the 2011-2012 and now stands in 174th places of 179 countries.
 
RankCountryScore
174 China 136,00
175 Iran 136,60
176 Syria 138,00
177 Turkmenistan 140,67
178 North Korea 141,00
179 Eritrea 142,00
 

Saturday, 25 February 2012

New York police orders removal of hunger strike tent,

Phayul[Saturday, February 25, 2012 04:16]
DHARAMSHALA, February 25: The New York Police Department has ordered the removal of the tent hosting the three Tibetan hunger strikers in front of the United Nations headquarters.

Tsewang Rigzin, president of the Tibetan Youth Congress, the largest pro-independence group in exile and organisers of the ongoing indefinite hunger strike has reported the latest development.

“NYPD orders removal of tent hosting the three hunger strikers,” Rigzin announced on his social networking page. 'Citing ‘Occupy Wall Street’, NYPD ordered the removal of the tent from the hunger strike site.”

The three Tibetans began their indefinite fast in front of the United Nations Headquarters in New York on February 22, coinciding with the first day of Losar – Tibetan New Year.

The three Tibetans, including an exiled reincarnate lama Shingza Rinpoche are sitting in the ‘Indefinite Fast for Tibet’ in solidarity with Tibetans inside Tibet and to “amplify their call for freedom.”

They are directly appealing the United Nations to immediately send a fact-finding delegation to Tibet, put pressure on China – to stop the undeclared martial law in Tibet, to allow international media inside Tibet, to release all political prisoners including Gedun Choekyi Nyima and Tulku Tenzin Delek, and to stop the “patriotic re-education” campaign in Tibet.

“We also appeal world leaders and governments to intervene and engage directly with the Chinese leadership to stop the ongoing genocide in Tibet,” the Tibetans had said in an earlier release.

The president of TYC said that the hunger strikes were moved to a temporary location near the initial site of protest and were determined to continue with their demands.

“Come rain, wind or NYPD, the hunger strikers are not deterred and ready to go on until UN hears them,” Rigzin said.

Despite of the police orders, the indefinite fast is being observed amidst the continuing wave of self-immolations in Tibet and the growing military clampdown in many parts of Tibet.

Since 2009, 23 Tibetans in Tibet have torched their bodies demanding the return of Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama and freedom in Tibet.

Tibet has been cut off from the outside world following a Chinese government decree. Internet and phone lines in the restive regions of eastern Tibet have remained shut for nearly a month.

The sudden move by the authorities has drawn criticism from Tibetans and rights activists.

A Tibetan asks on a social networking site: “Why Tibetans are being treated differently? Are we less human or is the path to free Tibet too non-violent?”

Three Tibetans begin indefinite fast at UN headquarters

Phayul[Thursday, February 23, 2012 08:20]
(From left to right) Dorjee Gyalpo, Shingza Rinpoche and Yeshi Tenzing, the three Tibetans on indefinite fast infront of the UN headquarters in New York, February 22, 2012.
(From left to right) Dorjee Gyalpo, Shingza Rinpoche and Yeshi Tenzing, the three Tibetans on indefinite fast infront of the UN headquarters in New York, February 22, 2012.
DHARAMSHALA, February 23: Tibetan Youth Congress, the largest pro-independence group in exile launched an indefinite fast in front of the United Nations Headquarters in New York on February 22, the first day of Losar – Tibetan New Year.

Three Tibetans, including a high reincarnate lama are taking part in the ‘Indefinite Fast for Tibet’ to show solidarity with Tibetans inside Tibet and to “amplify their call for freedom.”

His Eminence 11th Shingza Rinpoche, 32, a well known political and literary activist, Dorjee Gyalpo, 59, a Tibetan-American, and Yeshi Tenzing, 39, a long-time TYC activist are the three Tibetans undertaking the indefinite fast.

The three are directly appealing the United Nations to immediately send a fact-finding delegation to Tibet, put pressure on China – to stop the undeclared martial law in Tibet, to allow international media inside Tibet, to release all political prisoners including Gedun Choekyi Nyima and Tulku Tenzin Delek, and to stop the “patriotic re-education” campaign in Tibet.

“We also appeal world leaders and governments to intervene and engage directly with the Chinese leadership to stop the ongoing genocide in Tibet,” the Tibetans said.

Since Tapey’s self-immolation protest in 2009, 23 Tibetans have torched their bodies demanding the return of Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama and freedom in Tibet.

Launching the fast in front of the UN building, TYC said these “fearless acts” of self-immolation were a constant reminder to the Chinese government and the world that “Tibetans are demanding independence.”

“The world cannot continue the blunders of remaining blindly dependent on the Chinese government’s misrepresentation of the Tibetan independence movement shamelessly framed as ethnic conflict or simply reduced as a struggle for religious freedom,” TYC said.

“So long as China continues to illegally occupy Tibet, the indefinable oppression of the Tibetan people will only continue; and so will continue Tibetan’s demand for independence with the will and the resistance only growing stronger.”

The fiery wave of self-immolation has witnessed a dramatic escalation in recent weeks with as much as three Tibetans torching their bodies last week alone.

TYC noted that the “sacrifices of these patriots” were proof of China’s “failing efforts to win the hearts and minds of the Tibetan people.”

“China must wake up to the reality that it can never dream of conquering the undying will of the Tibetan people who stand united and resolute to ultimately bring down the brutal communist Chinese regime,” TYC said.

The three Tibetans sitting on the indefinite fast called on the United Nations and world leaders to “heed to the demands of the Tibetans suffering in Tibet.”

“If you do not take immediate actions to help douse the burning flames inside Tibet, you become accountable to every growing casualty within the Tibetan population,” the release said.

The Tibetan leadership in exile and rights groups have expressed fear of more self-immolations and bloodshed as many parts of Tibet continue to remain under an undeclared martial law with Chinese security personnel gunning down unarmed Tibetan protesters in recent weeks.

Tuesday, 21 February 2012

Film: Little Tibet Sun, 4th Mar 2012

Wiltshire’s Global Village Film Festival Presents
DATE: Sun, 4th March 2012   TIME 5.30pm 
VENUE:  Hartham Park
Corsham
Wiltshire
SN13 0RP
PRICE
Standard: £5.00
Concessions: £4.50
Known as Little Tibet, Ladakh borders Tibet and sits on the roof of the world in northern India. Sonam is a Tibetan who can no longer return to his own country and is in search of Tibet outside of Tibet. Sharing much of Tibet's culture, language and landscape could Ladakh be that place? Follow his journey through rain, snow and desert where he discovers the beauty of his culture preserved in this remote, high altitude land.
Meet the director - a post film discussion with Nawang N. Anja-Tsang
With support from White Horse Pictures
Tickets  from Pound Arts Centre Box office Corsham Tel. 01249  701 628


This Event was sold out, see trailer below 


Sunday, 19 February 2012

Another self-immolation days ahead of Losar

Phayul[Sunday, February 19, 2012 16:27]
By Tendar Tsering

DHARAMSHALA, February 19: Amidst the ongoing self-immolations, another teenaged Tibetan in Tibet set himself on fire and is reportedly dead.

The 18 year old teenaged Tibetan, Nangdrol set himself on fire today in the afternoon in Amdo Ngaba, the nerve centre of almost all the Tibetan self-immolations in the recent months.

"Nangdrol set himself on fire and died on the spot. Right now his body is with the Ngaba Dzomthum monastery," Tsayang Gyaltso, an exiled Tibetan told Phayul citing his contacts in Tibet.The monastery in the region took the charred body of Nangdrol and performed religious services.

"Nangdrol has also left his testament," Tsayang Gyaltso said.

The fiery wave of self-immolations that has gripped Tibet for the last 11 months has, off late, witnessed an alarming increase in the rate at which Tibetans are willing to torch their bodies.

Tibetans in exile fear that there will be more loss of Tibetan lives and bloodshed in the coming days coinciding with the Tibetan New Year which falls on 22nd February and on the Anniversary of the Tibetan National Uprising in March.

So far more than two dozen Tibetans in Tibet have torched their bodies and a dozen others died under the Chinese open fire calling for freedom in Tibet and return of the Dalai Lama from exile.

Fire rages on in Tibet – Another Tibetan burns to death

Phayul[Friday, February 17, 2012 18:51]
DHARAMSHALA, February 17: Yet another Tibetan has died in the continuing wave of self-immolation in Tibet.

Dhamchoe Sangpo, a monk from Bongthak Ewam Tare Shedrup Dhargey Ling monastery in the Tsongon region of Amdo, eastern Tibet set his body on fire at around 6 am local time in an apparent protest against the Chinese government.

The Dharamshala based Tibetan Parliament-in-Exile, in a release today said that Dhamchoe Sangpo, 38, passed away soon after his self-immolation protest.
Dhamchoe Sangpo was the youngest of ten siblings.

Following earlier protest by a monk identified as Kalsang from the Bongthak monastery against a planned silver mining project in the region, the monastery had been facing severe repression from local Chinese government authorities.

“Off late, Chinese armed forces had surrounded the monastery with military vehicles, hindering the monastery’s prayer ceremonies and warning the monks of sealing the monastery if they failed to behave,” the release said.

Although there are no further details available on Dhamchoe Sangpo’s self-immolation, Chinese government officials and armed forces are currently carrying out door to door searches at the monastery.

“The monastery is under a military lockdown and the situation there is very tense,” the Tibetan Parliament said.

Since Tapey's self-immolation in 2009, 24 Tibetans have set their bodies on fire demanding the return of Tibetan spiritual His Holiness the Dalai Lama from exile and protesting China's continued occupation of Tibet.

The exile Tibetan leadership and rights groups have expressed fear of more self-immolations and further bloodshed in Tibet following an undeclared martial law in many Tibetan areas and the violent crackdown over peaceful protests in recent weeks.

The Tibetan Parliament, in an open letter addressed to the president of the People’s Republic of China, Hu Jintao, had urged him to withdraw the large military reinforcements from Tibetan areas and take measure to give due consideration to the aspirations of the Tibetan people.

The letter also urged President Hu to “stop policies and programmes aimed at destroying the identity of the Tibetan people” while calling for the resumption of “dialogue with the Tibetans with the commitment and conviction to seek a lasting solution to the issue of Tibet.”

Monday, 13 February 2012

Another teenage Tibetan self immolates

Watch the report and read the article from Guardiam journalist  in Ngaba here

Phayul[Monday, February 13, 2012 23:12]
A file photo of Losang Gyatso, 19 who self-immolated shouting slogans of protest against the Chinese government in Ngaba, eastern Tibet on February 13, 2012. (Photo/Kirti monastery)
A file photo of Losang Gyatso, 19 who self-immolated shouting slogans of protest against the Chinese government in Ngaba, eastern Tibet on February 13, 2012. (Photo/Kirti monastery)
DHARAMSHALA, February 13: Yet another teenage Tibetan monk has set his body on fire protesting against the Chinese government today.

The Tibetan has been identified as Losang Gyatso, age 19, a monk at the Kirti monastery in the beleaguered region of Ngaba, eastern Tibet.

The exile base of Kirti monastery in Dharamshala, in a release late today, confirmed the information.

“At about 2.30 pm on February 13th, Kirti monk Losang Gyatso, age 19, of the Badzritsang house in Naktsangma of Cha township, set himself on fire at the top of the main street of Ngaba town,” the release said.

“Losang Gyatso was shouting slogans of protest against the Chinese government,” eyewitnesses in the region have told sources in exile.

Special police forces arrived at the scene and extinguished the fire. According to the eyewitnesses the Chinese security personnel were beating Losang Gyatso as they took him away to an undisclosed location.

At the time of reporting there is no information on his condition or whereabouts.

Losang Gyatso is the eldest of his four siblings and is being described as “one of the best and brightest students in his class”.

At the scene of Losang Gyatso’s self-immolation, two unidentified Tibetan youths were severely beaten by Chinese security personnel.

“One managed to get away with help from the public onlookers, but the other was led away by two policemen,” Kirti monastery said in its release. “Witnesses said he was bleeding profusely from the head and arm”.

Locals report that extra security personnel have been deployed at checkpoints around Ngaba town and that people are being searched.

Reporting from Ngaba, a British journalist who was recently able to sneak into the ‘cut-off’ area, reported that being in Ngaba reminded him of the conflict zones in Iraq and Northern Ireland at the height of their trouble.

"There are police maybe every 30 or 40 metres and, in some cases, 30 or 40 police sitting together in riot police uniform with shields, with batons and something I'd never seen anywhere else before - some of those batons had spikes coming out of them. It looked totally medieval," the Guardian newspaper journalist reported.

The fiery wave of self-immolations that has gripped Tibet for the last 11 months, has, off late witnessed an alarming increase in the rate at which Tibetans are ready to torch their bodies. Just in the last 13 days, six Tibetans have set their bodies on fire demanding the return of exiled Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama and protesting China’s continued occupation of Tibet.

Since Tapey’s self-immolation in 2009, 23 Tibetans have set themselves ablaze.

The Tibetan leadership in exile and rights groups have expressed fear of more self-immolations and bloodshed as many parts of Tibet continue to remain under an undeclared martial law with Chinese security personnel gunning down unarmed Tibetan protesters in recent weeks.

Sunday, 12 February 2012

Group Raises cases of disappearances of Tibetan monk

From SaveTibet.org
GENEVA, February 9, 2012 - According to a report of the UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearance (WGEID) submitted to the 19th session of the UN Human Rights Council, the government of the People’s Republic of China continues to maintain, nearly 17 years after his enforced disappearance, that Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, the 11th Panchen Lama of Tibet, is not "under house arrest."  Official Chinese claims notwithstanding, the Panchen Lama has not been seen since he was taken from his home in May 1995, nor have numerous appeals by the international community for specific information about his welfare and whereabouts been satisfied.

"He and his family are currently leading normal lives in Tibet, and he is receiving an excellent education. They have on numerous occasions said that they do not wish to have their normal lives disrupted in any way, and we should fully respect their wishes" the Chinese authorities claimed in the communication with the Expert Group dated September 4, 2009.

The Working Group had issued an earlier statement on April 8, 2011, expressing concern about the Panchen Lama, “a case going back 16 years…He disappeared in 1995 when he was six years old. While the Chinese authorities have admitted taking him, they have continually refused to divulge any information about him or his whereabouts, making his case an enforced disappearance. A number of human rights mechanisms including the UN Committee against Torture, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, as well as Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief, have all called for his whereabouts to be revealed, to no avail."

The new WGEID report also reveals that it had raised concern about the disappearances of 54 Tibetans who were detained in the aftermath of protests in the Kardze region of eastern Tibet June and July of 2011. At the time, Chinese authorities arrested “mainly nuns and monks calling for ’freedom of religion in Tibet.’”

Another major case the WGEID transmitted to China on May 23, 2011 concerned the disappearances of "approximately 300 monks" from Kirti Monastery in Ngaba on the night of April 21, 2011, who "were allegedly arrested and taken to unknown destinations in ten military trucks by agents from the People’s Armed Police, Public Security Bureau and People’s Liberation Army." Thereafter, in a public statement the WGEID again raised "its serious concern and urged the Chinese authorities to disclose the fate and whereabouts of all those who have been subject to enforced disappearances in China, including a group of Tibetan monks whose fate or whereabouts still remain unknown."

“We call on the authorities to provide full information on the fate and the whereabouts of the persons who have disappeared,” said the Working Group, noting that it is reported that some of the monks have been released. “We encourage the authorities to undertake full investigations into the on-going practice of enforced disappearances and ensure that those responsible are prosecuted and receive sentences appropriate to the gravity of the crime.”

On  November 1, 2011, WGEID together with five UN human rights experts issued a joint statement warning of "severe human rights restrictions on Tibetan Buddhist monasteries" while citing the situation in Ngaba. The statement said: "A group of United Nations independent experts voiced grave concern over reports of heavy security measures, in and around the area of the Tibetan Buddhist Kirti monastery - which houses some 2,500 monks- and other monasteries in Ngaba (Chinese: Aba) County, an area of Sichuan province with many ethnic Tibetans in south-west China."

“Any enforced disappearance is unacceptable and such practices are in violation of international law,” said Mr. Jeremy Sarkin, the Chair-Rapporteur of the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances, expressing further concern that a proposed revision to the Chinese Criminal Procedure Law would legalize enforced disappearances in the country. “This heinous practice is not permitted under any circumstances. No exceptional circumstances whatsoever may be invoked to justify an enforced disappearance.”

China was also alerted by the WGEID on August 30, 2011 jointly with three other special procedures mechanisms, about the concerns about the welfare of "Buddhist monk Mr. Jigme Guri (also known as Akhu Jigme and Lama Jigme), who was allegedly arrested by police and security forces on August 20, 2011, in the hotel ‘Z-hong Yan’ in Hezou, Kanlho prefecture."

On October 6, 2011, after receiving information about the self-immolations by Kirti Monastery monks, Lobsang Kelsang and Lobsang Kunchok, the WGEID transmitted the case of their disappearances to the Chinese government. The intervention stated that the Working Group and other experts were "concerned the alleged continued harassment and repression of the monastic community in and around the Ngaba Kirti Monastery and the self-immolation of two young monks, Mr. Lobsang Kelsang Harutsang and Mr. Lobsang Kunchok, on 26 September 2011.” The Working Group stated its concern that “Chinese security forces and the police extinguished the fire and the two monks were taken away to an unknown location. It has also been alleged that one monk has died following the self-immolation."

This latest WGEID report to the Human Rights Council, whose 19th session will begin on February 27, 2012, also referred to cases of enforced disappearance in China, Eastern Turkestan and Inner Mongolia. The report is scheduled for a debate on March 5, 2012, with NGOs expected to react on these alarming developments of disappearances.
The full WGEID report is available for download at www2.ohchr.org.

A teenage nun self-immolates

Phayul[Saturday, February 11, 2012 23:47]
Tenzin Choedron, 18, a nun from the Mamae nunnery in Ngaba, eastern Tibet, set her body on fire protesting the Chinese governemnt on February 11, 2012. (Photo/Kirti Monastery)
Tenzin Choedron, 18, a nun from the Mamae nunnery in Ngaba, eastern Tibet, set her body on fire protesting the Chinese governemnt on February 11, 2012. (Photo/Kirti Monastery)
DHARAMSHALA, February 11: In confirmed reports coming out of Tibet, a teenage Tibetan nun set her body on fire raising slogans against the Chinese government in Ngaba, eastern Tibet today.

The exile base of Kirti monastery in Dharamshala, in a release today identified the nun as Tenzin Choedron, 18, from the Mamae Dechen Choekhorling nunnery.

“At 6 pm on February 11, Tenzin Choedron, age 18, a nun at the Mamae nunnery in Ngaba, set herself on fire while shouting slogans of protest against the Chinese government,” the release said.

Eyewitnesses have told sources in exile that Tenzin Choedron did not die on the spot and was immediately taken away by Chinese security personnel towards Barkham region.

Following the self-immolation, Chinese armed forces surrounded the nunnery and sealed it off. At the time of reporting, no further information is available.

Born to Lopay and Tsepo, Tenzin Choedron is the eldest of her four siblings.

On October 17 last year, nun Tenzin Wangmo, around 20 years of age, from Mamae nunnery had set herself on fire demanding the return of His Holiness the Dalai Lama from exile. Tenzin Wangmo passed away immediately.

The Dechen Choekorling nunnery, located at a distance of around 3 kms from Ngaba town is the largest nunnery in the region with more than 350 nuns.

During the pan-Tibet uprisings of 2008, the Mamae nuns staged a protest march, carrying a portrait of the Dalai Lama, following which many nuns were arrested and detained.

The entire Ngaba region, which alone has witnessed 14 instances of self-immolations, continues to remain tense following the self-immolation of a 19-year old Tibetan Rigzin Droje on Febraury 8.

In Tibet, 22 Tibetans have set their bodies on fire demanding the return of exiled Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama and protesting China’s continued occupation of Tibet. Just this month, six self-immolations have already occurred.

Many parts of Tibet remain cut off from outside world with a prevailing situation of undeclared martial law following mass protests in recent weeks in which at least a dozen Tibetans are feared dead in police firings.

The Tibetan exile leadership and rights groups have expressed fear of further bloodshed and self-immolations in Tibet.

Saturday, 11 February 2012

Chalk Tibet in Bath 11th Feb 2012

A ' Chalk Tibet' event was held in Bath this morning (11th Feb 2012) around the Abbey.  The event was designed to highlight what has been happening recently in Tibetan areas of China: the immolations and shooting dead of Tibetan protesters by Chinese forces.  The event created  much interest including some from the Chinese community who were shocked that these events were going on in China.












   

EDM 2715 UK parliament condemns China's use of force in Tibet

Duncan Hames MP (Chippenham) has signed EDM 2715
Don Foster MP (Bath) has signed EDM 2715
The British House of Commons.
The British House of Commons.
An Early Day Motion (EDM) condemning the Chinese security forces’ “unwarranted use” of force on unarmed Tibetan protesters and calling on Prime Minister David Cameron to make a public statement of concern on the “deteriorating human rights situation in Tibet” was tabled on February 8 in the British Parliament.

The motion expressed the Parliament’s great sadness on the loss of life both of Tibetans who were “shot and killed” in peaceful demonstrations and the instances where Tibetans have resorted to self-immolation in an effort to draw attention to the ongoing repression by the Chinese authorities.

Sponsoring the motion, Fabian Hamilton MP and chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Tibet conveyed the Parliament’s alarm at the imposition of “de facto martial law” in Tibetan regions, the restriction of movement for Tibetans and the “complete ban on foreign media.”

Urging its government to put pressure on China to “ease tensions” by withdrawing its armed forces from Tibetan areas, the motion called on Beijing to give foreign journalists, humanitarian agencies and independent observers “full and unfettered” access to Tibetan areas to ascertain the current situation.

The motion further called on the British Government to work with other governments in safeguarding Tibetans’ rights and instigating a “multilateral approach whereby international governments together urge the Chinese government to enter into immediate and unconditional negotiations with representatives of the Tibetan people in order to resolve the Tibetans' underlying grievances”.

The motion was tabled, coinciding with the global vigil on February 8, called in solidarity with Tibetans inside Tibet by the exile Tibetan leadership.

Although EDMs are formal motions submitted for debate in the British House of Commons, however, very few EDMs are actually debated upon, with most of them used at demonstrating the extent of parliamentary support for a particular cause or point of view.

Ahead of the 53rd anniversary of the March 10 Tibetan National Uprising Day, Tibetans and supporters in the UK are planning a series of campaigns which include a mass lobby of Parliament and a Tibetan freedom March outside the Chinese Embassy in London.

The Details of the EDM are below - check the following link to see if your MP has signed it.


DETERIORATING HUMAN RIGHTS IN TIBET

That this House strongly condemns the Chinese security forces' unwarranted use of force including opening fire on unarmed demonstrators to quash peaceful protests in Tibet; is greatly saddened by the loss of life both of Tibetans who were shot and killed whilst protesting and the instances where Tibetans have resorted to self-immolation in an effort to draw attention to the ongoing repression by the Chinese authorities; is alarmed by the imposition of de facto martial law in Tibetan regions, the restriction of movement for Tibetans and the complete ban on foreign media; calls on the Prime Minister to make a public statement of concern on the deteriorating human rights situation in Tibet; further calls on the Government to urge the Chinese government to ease tensions by withdrawing its armed forces from Tibetan areas, to release full details of all incidents involving its forces opening fire upon civilians and to give foreign journalists, humanitarian agencies and independent observers full and unfettered access to Tibetan areas to ascertain the current situation; and further calls on the Government to work with other governments to safeguard Tibetans' rights and interests and instigate a multilateral approach whereby international governments together urge the Chinese government to enter into immediate and unconditional negotiations with representatives of the Tibetan people in order to resolve the Tibetans' underlying grievances.

TIBETAN LAMA URGES UNITY, NATIONHOOD BEFORE SELF-IMMOLATING

Final Words of Lama Soepa Recorded in Audio Message to Tibetans

Listen to the audio message recorded by Lama Soepa

New York - An audio recording with the final words of a Tibetan lama who set himself on fire in Tibet on January 8, 2012, in protest of Chinese rule has surfaced from sources in Tibet. Lama Soepa, a spiritual teacher and community leader from Golok in the Kham region of eastern Tibet (Ch: Guoluo Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai Province), urges Tibetans to "unite and work together to build a strong and prosperous Tibetan nation…" in an audio message recorded before his final act of protest. His message addresses Tibetans living inside Tibet and in exile, calling for unity and strength amongst all Tibetans and the preservation of language and culture.



"Lama Soepa's deeply moving message is the most definitive and eloquent articulation of the demands of the 17 Tibetans who have self-immolated for the cause of the Tibetan nation," said Tenzin Dorjee, Executive Director of Students for a Free Tibet. "Lama Soepa clearly explains that his motivation in carrying out this act is to ease the suffering of his fellow Tibetans. His words communicate strength, determination, and a sense of hope for a future in which Tibetans will live free from Chinese rule."



"Contrary to Chinese government claims, Tibetans who have set themselves on fire in protest were exemplary community members and even widely respected Tibetan leaders who displayed courage and integrity in their final acts of defiance -- qualities of character far beyond the reach of the Chinese bureaucrats and officials who attempt to demonize them from Beijing," he added.



The complete translation of Lama Soepa's message is included below.

 Listen to the audio recording of Lama Soepa's message.

TRANSLATION OF LAMA SOEPA’S AUDIO STATEMENT RECORDED BEFORE HIS SELF-IMMOLATION



To all the six million Tibetans, including those living exile -- I am grateful to Pawo Thupten Ngodup and all other Tibetan heroes, who have sacrificed their lives for Tibet and for the reunification of the Tibetan people; though I am in my forties, until now I have not had the courage like them. But I have tried my best to teach all traditional fields of knowledge to others, including Buddhism.



This is the twenty-first century, and this is the year in which so many Tibetan heroes have died. I am sacrificing my body both to stand in solidarity with them in flesh and blood, and to seek repentance through this highest tantric honor of offering one’s body. This is not to seek personal fame or glory.

I am giving away my body as an offering of light to chase away the darkness, to free all beings from suffering, and to lead them – each of whom has been our mother in the past and yet has been led by ignorance to commit immoral acts – to the Amitabha, the Buddha of infinite light. My offering of light is for all living beings, even as insignificant as lice and nits, to dispel their pain and to guide them to the state of enlightenment. I offer this sacrifice as a token of long-life offering to our root guru His Holiness the Dalai Lama and all other spiritual teachers and lamas.



[Lama Soepa recites the prayer of the Mandala Offering]

/The universal ground purified with blessed water spread, / This magnificent continent adorned with the sun and moon. / I offer them with pure realm of the enlightened in mind, / May all sentient beings enjoy this pure land! / My mind, body, speech, all my possessions and merits, / And this precious Mandala and all other offerings, / I offer all these to the Three Jewels with my fervent prayers, / Compassionately accept these and bless me and all other sentient beings. / I send forth this bejeweled Mandala to you, precious teacher!/



I am taking this action neither for myself nor to fulfill a personal desire nor to earn an honor. I am sacrificing my body with the firm conviction and a pure heart just as the Buddha bravely gave his body to a hungry tigress (to stop her from eating her cubs). All the Tibetan heroes too have sacrificed their lives with similar principles. But in practical terms, their lives may have ended with some sort of anger. Therefore, to guide their souls on the path to enlightenment, I offer prayers that may lead all of them to Buddhahood.

May all spiritual teachers and lamas inside Tibet and in exile live long. Especially, I pray that His Holiness the Dalai Lama will return to Tibet and remain as Tibet’s temporal and spiritual leader.

[Lama Soepa recites the Long-life Prayer for the Dalai Lama.]

/Circled by ramparts of snow-mountains, this sacred realm, / This wellspring of all sustenance and happiness. / Tenzin Gyatso, bodhisattva of compassion. / May his reign endure till the end of existence. / May his great deeds spread across the space. All those who have forms and are formless, / Those who bear hostility towards the Buddha dharma, / May all of them be found and defeated, / By the Three Jewels and the power of truth./

[Lama Soepa recites additional prayers.]

To all my spiritual brothers and sisters, and the faithful ones living elsewhere: You must unite and work together to build a strong and prosperous Tibetan nation in the future. This is the sole wish of all the Tibetan heroes. Therefore, you must avoid any quarreling amongst yourselves whether it is land disputes or water disputes. You must maintain unity and strength. Give love and education to the children, who should study hard to master all the traditional fields of studies. The elders should carry out spiritual practice as well as maintain and protect Tibetan language and culture by using all your resources and by involving your body, speech and mind. It is extremely important to genuinely practice Buddhist principles in order to benefit the Tibetan cause and also to lead all sentient beings towards the path of enlightenment. Tashi Delek.

To all my close friends, relatives, students, everyone from my native home and especially xx [name not clear in the audio]; I have not accumulated any wealth in my life. Whatever I had, I spent it on teaching and in pursuit of spiritual matters. This will leave no doubt or talks about having left behind huge sums of money. Thus, my siblings, relatives and patrons from different places should bear this in mind. As for my personal belongings and other items, I hope they will be given away to needy people or offered to spiritual teachers and lamas.



May all the merits that I have accumulated benefit all sentient beings, especially those who are suffering in lower realms such as hell. I offer these prayers for them to attain higher rebirth.

[Lama Soepa recites additional prayers.]

Translation by Bhuchung D. Sonam in Dharamsala, India

Thursday, 9 February 2012

Tibet continues to burn: Another self-immolation reported


Phayul[Friday, February 10, 2012 02:17]
DHARAMSHALA, February 10: There are reports of yet another self-immolation that took place yesterday in the Keygudo (Ch: Yushu) region of eastern Tibet.

Although initial reports are scare, the Tibetan is being described as a monk in his thirties from the La Monastery in Tridu, Keygudo.

“A monk in his 30s set fire to himself on the main road of La Township, Tridu County, Keygudo Autonomous Prefecture (Ch: Chenduo County, Yushu Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai) yesterday, 8 February, between 1 and 2pm local time,” a release by the London based campaign group Free Tibet said.

Eyewitnesses report that the monk was alive but in a serious condition when he was taken away by Chinese security personnel.

The fiery wave of self-immolations is now spreading to other areas of Tibet with yesterday’s self-immolation being the first reported from the Keygudo region. The rate at which Tibetans are setting themselves ablaze has also seen an alarming increase.

On February 8, just a day earlier, Rigzin Dorze, 19, set himself on fire in Me’uruma township of Ngaba. Eyewitnesses said his condition was very serious and it is not yet known whether he is dead or alive.

Just this year, nine Tibetans have set themselves ablaze demanding the return of exiled Tibetan leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Since Tapey’s self immolation in 2009, now 21 Tibetans have torched their bodies protesting China’s continued occupation of Tibet.

On February 8, coinciding with the call for a global solidarity vigil for Tibetans inside Tibet made by the exile Tibetan leadership, around 400 monks from the Dzil Kar monastery in Tridu began a protest march to Dza Toe town at 10 am local time.

The monks carrying banners demanding the return of His Holiness the Dalai Lama from exile and respect for Tibetan lives were confronted by a large number of armed Chinese security personnel at a bridge leading to the town and were apprehended from moving further.

However, there were no reports of arrest following the protest.

In another protest on February 4 Saturday, four Tibetans were arrested by Chinese security personnel for carrying out a peaceful protest in front of a Chinese police station at Dza Toe town again in Tridu region of Keygudo.

The four Tibetans; Tsering Palden, Tsering Sangpo, Tsering Tashi and Dorjee raised slogans calling for Tibet’s independence and the return of the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

The current whereabouts of the Tibetans remain unknown.

Send a message to the EU China summit 14th Feb

You can send a message to the EU Council using the following link http://www.consilium.europa.eu/contacts/info-public?lang=en

Mention the immolations and ask the EU representatives to ask the Chinese to stop the repression in Tibet

Italian Parliament urges EU to raise Tibet at EU-China Summit


Phayul[Thursday, February 09, 2012 16:17]
By Tendar Tsering

His Holiness the Dalai Lama with Gianni Vernetti, the Vice-President of the Italian Parliamentary Group for Tibet (left)and Matteo Mecacci, the President of the Italian Parliamentary Inter-Group for Tibet (right)in Rome, November 2011.
His Holiness the Dalai Lama with Gianni Vernetti, the Vice-President of the Italian Parliamentary Group for Tibet (left)and Matteo Mecacci, the President of the Italian Parliamentary Inter-Group for Tibet (right)in Rome, November 2011.
DHARAMSHALA, February 9: The Italian Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of the Italian Parliament unanimously adopted a resolution yesterday urging the Italian government to initiate its European Union partners in raising the issue of Tibet during the upcoming EU-China Summit in Beijing on February 14.

The resolution introduced by Gianni Vernetti called upon the Chinese government to immediately end the undeclared martial law in Tibet and resume the deferred dialogue process with the envoys of the Dalai Lama.

Introducing the resolution to the press, Vernetti said: "The Resolution approved today by the Italian Parliament sends a strong message to the People Republic of China requesting an immediate cessation of violence against Tibetan people and Tibetan monks and nuns."

"The resolution commits the (Italian) Government to raise the issue of human rights in Tibet on the occasion of the next European Union-China Summit that will begin February 14th in Beijing."

Referring to the fiery wave of self-immolations and the recent surge in China’s violent crackdown on unarmed Tibetan protesters, the resolution said that these episodes were self-evident of the “extreme despair” to which Tibetan monks and nuns have been driven by the “systematic denial of the right to freely practise their religion”.

The Italian lawmakers also urged the specialised agencies of the United Nations and in particular the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Human Rights Council to monitor respect for human rights in Tibet.

The resolution which was adopted on February 8, coinciding with the call for a global vigil for Tibet by exile Tibetan leadership, went on to call for the re-opening of Tibet to the outside world, guaranteeing the international media “free and unconditional access.”

The EU-China summit was initially scheduled for October last year.

Ties between EU and China recently hit a rough patch following EU’s condemnation of China and Russia for vetoing a United Nations Security Council resolution calling for an end to violence in Syria.

Catherine Ashton, the EU's foreign policy chief, said in a statement issued January 5: “We deeply regret that due to the renewed veto of the Russian Federation and China the Security Council was unable to support the call of the League of Arab States for an inclusive, Syrian-led political process conducted in an environment free from violence.”

China shoots down injured Tibetan, brother


Phayul[Thursday, February 09, 2012 23:31]
A Tibetan carrying a bullet injury to his stomach region following China's violent crackdown on protests in Drango, eastern Tibet on January 23, 2012.
A Tibetan carrying a bullet injury to his stomach region following China's violent crackdown on protests in Drango, eastern Tibet on January 23, 2012.
DHARAMSHALA, February 9: Phayul is getting confirmed reports that Chinese security personnel hunted down and killed a Tibetan who had suffered bullet wounds in the January 23 protests in Drango along with his brother earlier today.

The two have been identified as Yeshi Rigsel, 40 and Yeshi Samdup, 38.

Yeshi Rigsel had suffered bullet injuries to his arm on January 23 in Drango, eastern Tibet when Chinese security personnel opened indiscriminate fire on unarmed Tibetans. At least five Tibetans are feared dead and over 30 seriously injured in the police firings.

According to sources in exile with links in the region, the two brothers, Yeshi Rigsel and Yeshi Samdup had fled Drango town after the protests and were hiding in the mountains.

“The police had been on the look out for all the protesters in the near by areas, knowing that the ones nursing bullet injuries won’t be able to run for long,” Ven. Ngawang Woebar, a former political prisoner told Phayul.

After days of manhunt, the Chinese police tracked down the two brothers in the near by mountains and killed both of them at around 9.30 am local time.

“This cold blooded murder of an injured Tibetan along with his brother goes to show the climate of intense violence and repression in the region,” Ven. Woebar added.

The two deceased brothers belonged to a nomadic family from Norpa, near Drango.

Protests in Drango flared up on January 23, the first day of Chinese new year, after local Chinese Public Security Bureau officials began to arbitrarily arrest Tibetans on suspicion of their involvement in the appearance of leaflets and posters around the town warning of more Tibetan self-immolations if the Chinese government did not listen to Tibetan concerns.

The unarmed protesters, many of whom were farmers and nomads raised slogans calling for freedom in Tibet and the return of the Dalai Lama.

As the protests grew stronger, the Public Security Bureau and People's Armed Police intervened by using guns to rein in the protesters.

Earlier information had confirmed the death of Norpa Yonten and another unnamed Tibetan.

Following the protest, the entire region was placed under an undeclared martial law with police arresting 100 Tibetans from Drango on suspicion of their participation in the mass protests.

The first graphic images of the January 23 protests reached exile earlier this month. The photos showed in gory details, bullet injuries suffered by Tibetan protesters following the violent crackdown.

At least two Tibetans can be seen in the photos carrying bullet holes in the stomach area while others have blood coming out of bullet injuries in their arm and legs.

Latest self-immolating Tibetan identified as Rigzin Dorje


Phayul[Thursday, February 09, 2012 17:35]

DHARAMSHALA, February 9: The man who set himself on fire yesterday in the besieged Ngaba region of eastern Tibet has been identified as 19-year old Rigzin Dorje.

The exile base of Kirti monastery in Dharamshala in a release today said Rigzin Dorje alias Rigpe is from the Garpa Tsongko household in division no.2 of Me’uruma township, Ngaba and the youngest of six siblings.

Rigpe set himself on fire at around 6.30 pm local time on February 8.

Eyewitnesses have told sources in exile that Rigpe raised slogans against the Chinese government before setting himself ablaze.

He was taken away from the site of protest by Chinese security personnel first to the county hospital and later to Barkham.

“As of the night of February 8, he was believed to be on the verge of death, but no clear information on whether he is still alive is available,” Kirti monastery said in its release.

A former monk at the Kirti monastery, Rigpe has been described as a “kind and humble” person who used to enjoy looking after pigeons.

In continued protests in the Ngaba region, which alone has witnessed 13 instances of self-immolations, monks from the Se monastery took out a candle light march on February 5.

The monks were marching from their monastery to Ngaba town when they were confronted by Chinese security personnel and stopped from proceeding any further.

No information is available on whether any arrests have been made following the march.

The situation in Ngaba continues to remain tense with a strict security clampdown on the entire region. According to the release, the situation worsened over the last four days in the build up to the call for a global vigil for Tibet on February 8 by the exile Tibetan leadership.

“Beginning early morning on February 8, Tibetans, not only in Ngaba town but on all the roads leading into the town were stopped, searched, and questioned one by one,” the release said.

“Tibetans are being severely harassed and intimidated by security forces.”

In Tibet, 21 Tibetans have set their bodies on fire demanding the return of exiled Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama and protesting China’s continued occupation of Tibet.

Many parts of Tibet remain cut off from outside world with a prevailing situation of undeclared martial law following mass protests in recent weeks in which at least a dozen Tibetans are feared dead in police firings.

Fresh protests in Tibet


Phayul[Thursday, February 09, 2012 09:57]
Tibetans in Yushul region carrying out a protest on February 8, 2012 with banners calling for the return of the Dalai Lama and respect for Tibetan lives.
Tibetans in Yushul region carrying out a protest on February 8, 2012 with banners calling for the return of the Dalai Lama and respect for Tibetan lives.
DHARAMSHALA, February 9: Thousands of Tibetans in the Yushul area of eastern Tibet led a peaceful protest, carrying banners demanding the return of His Holiness the Dalai Lama from exile and respect for Tibetan lives yesterday. The protest coincided with the call for a global vigil on February 8 by the exile Tibetan leadership in solidarity with Tibetans inside Tibet.

In information received by Phayul, around 400 monks from the Dzil Kar monastery in Tridu began a protest march to Dza Toe town at 10 am local time. The monks were confronted by a large number of armed Chinese security personnel at a bridge leading to the town and were told that the march will not be allowed any further.

“As the confrontation grew, over a thousand Tibetans from the nearby areas joined the monks in the protest,” exile sources with links in the region told Phayul.

The monks unfurled banners, written in blue and red ink, symbolic of the two protector deities of Tibet, calling for the Dalai Lama’s return, release of Tibetan political prisoners including the XIth Panchen Lama and respect for Tibetan lives.

“The gathered Tibetans raised slogans and led their solidarity protest for nearly three hours,” the exile source confirmed.

However, no arrests were made during the protest but a large security build up has been reported in the region.

Yesterday’s protest in Yushul comes just a day after a top government official in Beijing said that China will “resolutely crack down” on any attempt to “incite violence or to disrupt national unity and integrity".

In the past few weeks, Chinese security personnel in the adjoining regions of Drango and Serthar had opened indiscriminate fire on unarmed protesters, killing and injuring a large number of Tibetans.

21 Tibetans have set their bodies on fire demanding the return of exiled Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama and protesting China’s continued occupation of Tibet. The latest self-immolation took place in the besieged Ngaba town yesterday.

Many parts of Tibet remain cut off from outside world with a prevailing situation of undeclared martial law following the fiery wave of self-immolations and mass protests.

Wednesday, 8 February 2012

Breaking News: Tibet is burning - Another self-immolation

Phayul[Wednesday, February 08, 2012 19:46]
DHARAMSHALA, February 8: Reports coming out of Tibet confirm that another Tibetan set himself on fire today.
The self-immolation took place at the No. 2 primary school in the besieged Ngaba town of eastern Tibet at around 6.30 pm local time.
In information received by Phayul from sources in exile, the Tibetan was heard raising slogans against the Chinese government while engulfed in fire.
"A Tibetan set himself on fire while shouting slogans in protest against the Chinese government," the exile base of Kirti monastery in Dharamshala said in a release citing links in the region.
According to eyewitnesses, the Tibetan is believed to be a monk but his name and place couldn't be ascertained at the time of reporting.
"He was taken away immediately by soldiers and police, and his present condition and whereabouts are not known," the release said.
In Tibet, 21 Tibetans have set their bodies on fire demanding the return of exiled Tibetan spiritual leader His Holiness the Dalai Lama and protesting China’s continued occupation of Tibet.
Many parts of Tibet remain cut off from outside world with a prevailing situation of undeclared martial law following mass protests in recent weeks in which at least a dozen Tibetans are feared dead in police firings.
The release also said that two unidentified monks were arrested from the vicinity today. Their identities and whereabouts are also not yet known.
Today's self immolation in Ngaba coincides with the call by the exile Tibetan leadership for a worldwide vigil against China's ever growing repression and military build-up in Tibet.

Monday, 6 February 2012

Tibetan officials warned to maintain stability

from BBC web site
The Tibetan regional government has warned its officials to maintain stability or face dismissal or criminal charges ahead of the Tibetan new year.
The notice was posted on the regional government website.
It follows a series of deadly protests in Sichuan province in January and the self-immolations of 19 ethnic Tibetans in the past year in apparent protest against Chinese rule.
Tibet celebrates its new year on 22 February.
The anniversary of deadly 2008 riots in Lhasa falls shortly afterwards, on 14 March.
'Extreme importance' Citing the government notice, the Tibet Daily newspaper said that officials were warned that they "must put all their efforts into maintaining a stable, unified social situation in our region".
They were also urged to "have a clear head and fully recognise the extreme importance and urgency of the job of maintaining stability".

The Tibet Divide

Map
The newspaper, however, made no mention of the recent protests or self-immolations.
According to the official government announcement, at least two alleged cases of dereliction of duty had been reported. No further details were provided.
The ethnic Tibetan areas of Sichuan province are said to remain extremely tense. Correspondents say the recent violence in the region is the most serious outbreak of anti-government protest among Tibetans in nearly four years.
Since March 2011, at least 19 Tibetans have set themselves on fire in apparent protest against Beijing's rule. The most recent three cases happened on Friday in Seda county in Sichuan province, activists said.
Last month, three violent protests were reported in the same province. One protester was killed on 23 January in a confrontation with security forces in Draggo county, known as Luhuo in Chinese.
China also confirmed that a Tibetan was shot dead by security forces in Seda county on 25 January. A man in Aba prefecture was also reportedly shot dead during a protest in the week that followed.
Tibetan campaign groups, however, say that the number of Tibetans shot dead is higher than the Chinese government's count. The figures are hard to verify because foreign journalists are not allowed to enter areas of unrest in Sichuan.
In March 2008, deadly riots erupted in Lhasa, Tibet's capital, and spread across the region.

Three Tibetans 'in anti-China fire protest' in Seda

From the BBC 
Three Tibetans have set fire to themselves in south-west China, reports say, in the latest apparent protest against rule from Beijing.
US-based Radio Free Asia said they had called for the return of Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama during the protest in Sichuan province.
Exiled activists said one Tibetan died and the others had serious injuries.
If confirmed, the latest protest would mean 19 Tibetans had self-immolated in the past year and 13 of them had died.
Most of the protesters are Buddhist monks or nuns.
Western Sichuan is home to hundreds of thousands of Tibetans.
The BBC's Michael Bristow in Beijing says the authorities have launched a heavy security crackdown, sealing off much of the area.
Telephone lines have been cut and checkpoints have been set up along main roads, he says.

The Tibet Divide

Map 
 
Radio Free Asia quoted exiled sources saying the latest immolations took place in a village in Seda county on Friday.
The UK-based Free Tibet group issued a statement with a similar account of the incident.
However, an unnamed official at the local government told the Associated Press news agency on Sunday that "no such thing happened".
A Tibetan was shot dead by security forces in Seda town on 25 January, some 145km (90 miles) from the latest incident.
International media are denied access to the area, making it difficult to verify conflict accounts.
Beijing has described the self-immolators as terrorists.
Officials have also blamed outside forces, particularly the Dalai Lama, for encouraging these act of defiance.
He denies that and blames the heavy-handed treatment of Tibetans for causing discontent.

Chinese official letter warns countries to no met Tibetan MPs

Phayul[Monday, February 06, 2012 04:38]
DHARAMSHALA, February 6: The Chinese Embassy in the India capital warned of adverse effect to bilateral relations if representatives of the various Diplomatic Missions in New Delhi met with a visiting delegation of Tibetans parliamentarians.

The Tibetan Parliament-in-Exile (TPiE), in a press release on January 28 had announced that a four-member parliamentary delegation, headed by MP Karma Chophel would be visiting New Delhi to call on representatives of Diplomatic Missions and the United Nations, following the recent surge in mass demonstrations and the growing instances of self-immolations in Tibet.

The Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in India responded by writing a letter addressed to “all Diplomatic Missions and Offices of the Specialised Agencies of the United Nations,” urging them not to receive the Tibetan parliamentarians.

“[T]he Embassy of the People’s Republic of China sincerely hope that the Diplomatic Missions and Offices of the Specialised Agencies of the United Nations in New Delhi will not receive the so called “representatives” of Dalai clique and refrain from having any contact with them, so as not to send out wrong signal which may be misused by Dalai clique and cause adversely effect to the mutually cherished bilateral relations,” the letter said.

Terming “Tibet-related issue” as an “internal matter” of China concerning the country’s “sovereignty and territorial integrity,” the letter dated January 30, went on to call the Tibetan parliamentary delegation, a “part of their plot to fabricate rumours and distort the truth to discredit the Chinese Government.”

However, China’s muscle flexing went largely ignored as a host of Ambassadors and representatives of Diplomatic Missions met with the Tibetan parliamentary delegation.

Ambassadors from the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Switzerland, Sweden, and Denmark personally met with the Tibetan MPs, while deputy heads and political officers from the United States, British, Canada, Germany, France, Taiwan embassies, and the European Union among others, received the Tibetan delegation.

The TPiE, in an open letter addressed to the president of the People’s Republic of China, Hu Jintao, had urged him to withdraw the large military reinforcements from Tibetan areas and take measure to give due consideration to the aspirations of the Tibetan people.

The letter also urged President Hu to “stop policies and programmes aimed at destroying the identity of the Tibetan people” while calling for the resumption of “dialogue with the Tibetans with the commitment and conviction to seek a lasting solution to the issue of Tibet.”

“We express the above sentiments with hope in our hearts that positive sense will prevail over you and your colleagues and immediately respond to the legitimate concerns, failing which you and your government will be held solely responsible for any adverse consequences if the matter are not addressed in a humane way,” the letter read.